What did the sugar act of 1764 do?

Enacted on April 5, 1764, to take effect on September 29, the new Sugar Act cut the duty on foreign molasses from 6 to 3 pence per gallon, retained a high duty on foreign refined sugar, and prohibited the importation of all foreign rum.

What was the main purpose of the Sugar Act in 1764?

Sugar Act, also called Plantation Act or Revenue Act, (1764), in U.S. colonial history, British legislation aimed at ending the smuggling trade in sugar and molasses from the French and Dutch West Indies and at providing increased revenues to fund enlarged British Empire responsibilities following the French and Indian

What was the Sugar Act in simple terms?

The Sugar Act (1764) was a tax passed by the British to pay for the Seven Years War, called the French and Indian War in America. It taxed sugar and decreased taxes on molasses in British colonies in America and the West Indies. This restricted smuggling.

Why did the Sugar Act upset the colonists?

The act placed a tax on sugar and molasses imported into the colonies. This was a huge disruption to the Boston and New England economies because they used sugar and molasses to make rum, a main export in their trade with other countries.

What is the Sugar Act of 1764 quizlet?

~The Sugar Act was passed on April 5th, 1764. ~This act put an end to smuggling trade in sugar and molasses from the French and Dutch West Indies and it was also to replace the ineffective Molasses Act of 1733. ~The Sugar Act also reduced trade between the Colonies and the other countries.

How did the Sugar Act happen?

On April 5, 1764, Parliament passed a modified version of the Sugar and Molasses Act (1733), which was about to expire. … The Sugar Act reduced the rate of tax on molasses from six pence to three pence per gallon, while Grenville took measures that the duty be strictly enforced.

What are 3 important facts about the Sugar Act?

The Sugar Act reduced the amount of tax that colonists had to pay on molasses by half but increased the enforcement of the law. This made smuggling of illegal molasses from non-British territories a lot harder. The tax on molasses under the Sugar Act was 3 cents per gallon.

Why did the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act draw fierce opposition from colonists?

Why did the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act draw fierce opposition from colonists? They argued that they were not being represented in Parliament and therefore could not be taxed. … American colonists rejected the theory of virtual representation, arguing that only direct representatives had the right to tax the colonists.

What was the purpose of the Sugar Act quizlet?

The Sugar Act, put into place by the British government, was enacted on April 5, 1764. The purpose of the act was to tax the importation of molasses from the West Indies, similar to the previous act, but now it was actually going to be enforced by the british navy.

What was the Sugar Act Ducksters?

Parliament passed the Sugar Act, which was a tax on sugar, wine, indigo (a type of color dye) and molasses. The last was very important to New England merchants, since they bought molasses to make rum to sell to other colonies including the French, Dutch, and Spanish.

How did the Sugar Act violate the colonists rights?

The act lowered the tax on molasses imported by the colonists. The act also let officers seize goods from smugglers without going to court. The ​Sugar Act and the new laws to control smuggling angered the colonists. They believed their rights as Englishmen were being violated.

What did the Sugar Act tax for kids?

It provided for a strongly enforced tax on sugar, molasses, and other products imported into the American colonies from non-British Caribbean sources. The act was also called the Plantation Act or the Revenue Act.

What was the purpose of the Stamp Act?

Stamp Act, (1765), in U.S. colonial history, first British parliamentary attempt to raise revenue through direct taxation of all colonial commercial and legal papers, newspapers, pamphlets, cards, almanacs, and dice.

What did colonial leaders fear about the Sugar Act?

What did colonial leaders fear about the Sugar Act? they feared Britain might be moving towards seizing power from colonial governments, such as the right to tax.

How did Colonist react to the Stamp Act?

The American colonists were angered by the Stamp Act and quickly acted to oppose it. Because of the colonies’ sheer distance from London, the epicenter of British politics, a direct appeal to Parliament was almost impossible. Instead, the colonists made clear their opposition by simply refusing to pay the tax.

How did the colonists react to the Sugar Act of 1764 quizlet?

How did the colonist react to The Sugar Act? It was the act that started it all, colonies started to smuggle in sugar. The British started to crack down on smugglers taking away their right of a jury with their trial. You just studied 11 terms!

What do sugar and stamps have to do with revolutions?

Although resented, the Sugar Act tax was hidden in the cost of import duties, and most colonists accepted it. The Stamp Act, however, was a direct tax on the colonists and led to an uproar in America over an issue that was to be a major cause of the Revolution: taxation without representation.

Did the Sugar Act tax Indigo?

In 1764 the British Parliament passed what became known as the Sugar Act. This imposed taxes and commercial regulations on goods imported into the colonies. It set a 3 pence tax on non British refined sugar and even higher taxes on coffee, indigo and Madera Wine.

How did the Sugar Act lead to independence?

By reducing the rate by half and increasing measures to enforce the tax, Parliament hoped that the tax would actually be collected. These incidents increased the colonists’ concerns about the intent of the British Parliament and helped the growing movement that became the American Revolution.

When did the Sugar Act happen?

Enacted on April 5, 1764, to take effect on September 29, the new Sugar Act cut the duty on foreign molasses from 6 to 3 pence per gallon, retained a high duty on foreign refined sugar, and prohibited the importation of all foreign rum.

What was the effect of the Stamp Act?

Instead of levying a duty on trade goods, the Stamp Act imposed a direct tax on the colonists. Specifically, the act required that, starting in the fall of 1765, legal documents and printed materials must bear a tax stamp provided by commissioned distributors who would collect the tax in exchange for the stamp.

What did the Stamp Act do quizlet?

The Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765. The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Ship’s papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed.

Why did the Stamp Act provoke such a strong response?

Why did the Stamp Act provoke such a strong response? because the colonists had not be consulted about its passage. It was another instance of “taxation without representation.”

Why was the Stamp Act unfair?

The Stamp Act was very unpopular among colonists. A majority considered it a violation of their rights as Englishmen to be taxed without their consent—consent that only the colonial legislatures could grant. Their slogan was “No taxation without representation”.

Why did Great Britain Pass the Sugar Act the Stamp Act and the Townshend Acts?

Great Britain passed the Sugar Act because they wanted to raise money from the colonies for Great Britain. … Some Items that were taxed were required colonists to pay for an official stamp, or seal, when they bought paper items.

Why did the Sugar Act anger the colonists quizlet?

Parliament sought out to impose greater taxes on colonists because Britain was it great debt after the war and needed financial help. … The colonies opposed the Sugar Act because the colonies felt that “taxation without representation” was tyranny and felt it was unfair that Britain taxed them on war exports.